LOEX Opening Plenary (2015)

Reflections on Reflection or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Embrace the Meta

As teaching librarians, we firmly believe that reflective thinking improves learning and improves practice. At conferences, in hallway conversations, alone in the early morning hours — we reflect on our teaching and on our students’ learning. For some of us, reflection is easier than breathing. For some of us, it’s a struggle. Reflective thinking is a powerful tool, one I can’t live without, but it’s not without its own dangers, pitfalls and stressors. It can make us feel powerful and accomplished, or alone and confused. It can point the way forward, or reinforce our existing assumptions and prejudices. And sometimes, the easier it comes, the less useful it is.

In this session, I want us to turn a reflective eye on our own reflective practice. We’re constantly evaluating and reevaluating our teaching. Our reflective habits need the same kind of attention and focus or they can become pro forma, stagnant and a whole lot less useful. When we don’t critically examine our reflective practices reflection can become just another tool we use to justify whatever we want it to, instead of inspiring meaningful change. Pushing ourselves — to uncomfortable truths, to activities that challenge us, to complicated ideas — keeps our reflection fresh and useful.


Follow-ups

 

Advertisements